Member Countries

Member Countries

It therefore believes that funding for connectivity initiatives in the Indo-Pacific area must be mobilised from varied sources, specifically from worldwide financial establishments, multilateral growth banks, the personal sector, and the European Investment Bank. Berlin sees connectivity as a platform for growing people-to-people exchanges and enhancing transport infrastructure, whose standards it holds should be agreed on multilaterally, together with through the G20 Principles on Quality Infrastructure Investment. While it believes that financial pursuits should predominate when the EU is deciding which connectivity infrastructure tasks to prioritise, Berlin would also prefer to see a rebalancing of the EU’s relationship with China within the interest of reducing the former’s dependency on the latter. Slovenia has additionally seen important discussions on implementing multilateral requirements for high quality infrastructure investments domestically. Large Chinese construction companies such as Ginex International are banned from taking part in main infrastructure tasks in Slovenia, following their failure to signal the WTO settlement on open public procurement or come to an settlement on public procurement with the EU or with Slovenia.

Leave a Reply